Emotional Intelligence Test

146 questions

PROGRESS STATUS:

75%
111.  The president of the company has just hired his son for a summer position in the department that Natalie manages. His son is intelligent and will be able to do the job well - and in his father's eyes, can do no wrong. As the weeks go by, Natalie notices that the son is doing less and less work and leaving earlier and earlier in the afternoon. His behavior is unfair to the other employees who work long hours and abide by stressful deadlines. How should Natalie deal with this behavior?
Wait for him to make the next premature exit, then loudly ask where he is going and let him know that as long as he is working in this department, he will follow the rules she sets. She should threaten to inform his father about his lack of work ethic.
She should let it go and pretend not to notice his early departures at all. If she complains, her boss will fire her.
She should speak with him in private, telling him that she would prefer that he be at work all day. But if he must disappear, she should ask him to be more discreet so that the other employees won't be so aware of his special treatment.
She should confront him and tell him that he is required to work full days. She should explain that anything short of a death in the family is an unacceptable reason to skip out early. She should also let him know that his relationship with his father has nothing to do with his job in her department.
She should ignore his disappearances but send him disapproving looks whenever they cross paths. Hopefully, he'll catch on that she's not impressed.
She should speak with him in private and offer him one of two options: either he works full days or switches to an hourly pay.
She should discuss the problem with his father, explaining that while she understands that it's his son, it's leaving a bad impression and is unfair to the other employees.
112.  How would you deal with his behavior if you were Natalie?
Wait for him to make the next premature exit, then loudly ask where he is going and let him know that as long as he is working in this department, he will follow the rules I set. I would threaten to inform his father about his lack of work ethic.
I would let it go and pretend not to notice his early departures at all. If I complain, my boss will fire me.
I would speak with him in private, telling him that I would prefer that he be at work all day. But if he must disappear, I would ask him to be more discreet so that the other employees won't be so aware of his special treatment.
I would confront him and tell him that he is required to work full days. I would explain that anything short of a death in the family is an unacceptable reason to skip out early. I would also let him know that his relationship with his father has nothing to do with his job in my department.
I would ignore his disappearances but send him disapproving looks whenever we cross paths. Hopefully, he'll catch on that I'm not impressed.
I would speak with him in private and offer him one of two options: either he works full days or switches to an hourly pay.
I would discuss the problem with his father, explaining that while I understand that it's his son, it's leaving a bad impression and is unfair to the other employees.